Tag Archives: Female Filmmakers

November 24

BITS 2017: Paint the Town Red, Itch, Crux: Black Sol Empire

Paint the Town Red Scoring tickets to an ultra upscale night club, Josephine (Ariel Hansen, who co-directs the film with Christopher Andrew Graham) and Andie (Allison Klause who is delightful in the role) are excited to have a girls’ night out on the town. Unlike her oblivious party eager friend, Andie cannot help but notice […]

November 10

Black Star: Black Mother Black Daughter, Whitewash and Black Soul

Three vastly different films. Three female directors. One enriching experience. This was not the official tagline for this particular Black Star shorts program, but it could have been. Though the centerpiece of the program was Sylvia Hamilton and Claire Prieto’s 1989 documentary short Black Mother Black Daughter, there was a thematic link with the two […]

November 04

Black Star: Jean of the Joneses

Do not be fooled by the jazzy New York vibe of Stella Meghie’s multigenerational comedy Jean of the Joneses. While it is reminiscent of the works of Woody Allen and Whit Stillman, Meghie’s film has its own wonderfully distinct voice. The film follows the mishaps of Jean (Taylour Paige), a promising young writer who is […]

October 22

imagineNATIVE 2017: The Road Forward

There’s been a great deal of discussion in recent years about the past and ongoing injustices suffered by the indigenous community. As there should be. From suicide epidemics to systemic racism to the alarming number of missing and murdered Aboriginal women to the over-representation of Aboriginal men in Canadian prisons, the challenges of the First […]

October 22

imagineNATIVE 2017: Kayak to Klemtu

Teenagers. They think they know it all, don’t they? They have this unbearable self-righteousness. They can take a motorboat to testify about the dangers posed by oil tankers and not feel a little hypocritical, not even a bit. The big picture is missed. Kayak to Klemtu, Zoe Hopkins’ first feature, finds itself in the same […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Our People Will Be Healed

Alanis Obomsawin is one of Canada’s most prolific filmmakers. At 85 years-old, and with an astounding 50 films under her belt, she has been an integral figure in promoting both indigenous culture and the issues that impact First Nation communities across the land. Last year, with her film We Can’t Make the Same Mistake Twice, […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Laundry

Kids ruin everything. They especially ruin sex. Carly is a happily married woman who just wants 10 minutes alone with her husband for some quality time. He’s definitely on board for the same. But try as they might – and they do try – the kids are always interrupting. Eventually Carly finds pleasure rather by […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Brown Lips

Writer–director Nakkiah Lui’s Brown Lips is a wonderful little short charged with teenage sexuality, rebellion, and taboo. As Kiera prepares for her debutante ball by ballroom dancing to Tchaikovsky’s Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker with her cousin Des. Their attraction to each other is palpable, communicated through brilliant bits of imagery, shot selection, […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Indictment: The Crimes of Shelly Chartier

NBA star Chris Anderson claims that he had no idea that the aspiring model that he met online was 17 when he flew her out from California to spend the weekend with him. The even bigger surprise came when the pair realized that they had never in fact spoken to each other before meeting face […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Mankiller

Wilma Mankiller: you may not know her name, but you should. She was the first woman elected Chief of the Cherokee nation, but her story is more complex than any list of her achievements would imply. Born to a Cherokee father and European mother, she was raised with sense of her culture but was influenced […]

October 20

imagineNATIVE 2017: Zaasaakwe

Zaasaakwe is more moving essay or tone poem than a narrative or documentary. The film juxtaposes native dancers adorned in traditional dress with young people walking the streets and riding skateboards. The film draws parallels between the struggles and hardships of the past and the strengths of the new generation. The film isn’t even five […]

October 19

imagineNATIVE 2017: Thirza Cuthand is an Indian Within the Meaning of the Indian Act

Thirza Cuthand is an award-winning filmmaker who has wrestled with questions of identity and belonging for most of her life. In her lastest short film, Cutland takes audiences on a personal journey as she details the struggles of being a light-skinned Cree woman in Canada. Born with a fairer complexion than those in her family, […]

October 18

imagineNATIVE 2017: Twilight Dancers

Far too often, an indigenous community makes the news because it’s dealing with a suicide epidemic. Cross Lake, Manitoba is one such community. In 2016 there were 140 suicide attempts in Cross Lake within a two week period. Six people were successful. Those staggering numbers are even more devastating when you consider that the population […]

October 17

imagineNATIVE 2017: Birth of a Family

Tasha Hubbard’s Birth of a Family documents the first meeting of a family torn asunder by racist government policies, decades after their separation. As infants, Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie, and Ben were taken from their indigenous mother and placed into separate white homes across North America as part of Canada’s “Sixties Scoop”. The story of […]

October 16

imagineNATIVE 2017: Waru

The death of a young boy hits a community like a tidal wave in the riveting film Waru. While the audience is not provided with much detail about the deceased child, the picture slowly begins to form when observing how eight vastly different women react to the news. All linked to the child in some […]

October 15

TADFF 2017: The Drop In

I enjoy short films because they are their own genre with their own rules. Unlike feature-length film, there’s no standard runtime, only an upper limit of 40 minutes (including credits) in order to qualify for Oscar consideration. The fact that shorts usually jump right into the action makes the genre feel freer and less predictable […]

October 10

Professor Marston & the Wonder Women

In a stroke of serendipitous timing, Angela Robinson’s film about the inspiration behind the Wonder Woman comic book drops the same year as Patty Jenkin’s adaptation of the superhero set the box office ablaze. Fortunately for Robinson, her film Professor Marston & the Wonder Women will only help to keep the collective passion for the […]

September 27

Do Donkeys Act?

Did you ever have existential questions about donkeys? No? Well, move on. Or not. The truth is, you haven’t seen anything like Do Donkeys Act? It’s a documentary about donkeys, made reputedly by humans (Ashley Sabin and David Redmon), for the enjoyment of – donkeys? There are no talking head interviews in the film, very […]

September 24

TIFF 2017: Mary Goes Round

The idea of a substance abuse counsellor who is an alcoholic herself is a premise ripe for comedy. In the hands of Molly McGlynn, the writer-director of Mary Goes Round, the jokes, as sly has they might be, take a backseat to the intricate drama on display. Prior to her DUI arrested, Mary (Aya Cash) […]

September 24

TIFF 2017: AVA

There is something undeniably universal about the teenage experience. While it can be argued that no two teens are exactly alike, the curiosities about the opposite sex and the questions about their own place in the world are identifiable regardless of where this coming-of-age ritual takes place. This is one of the reasons why Sadaf […]