Category Archives: Reviews

December 04

Last Flag Flying

The latest work by Richard Linklater is one of those films where it is not so much the journey itself that matters, but rather the people who are on it. Thirty years after serving in the Vietnam war together, Larry “Doc” Shepherd (Steve Carell), a Navy corpsman, seeks out his old Marine pals Sal Nealon […]

December 01

Coco

When I was much younger, there were times when I would wonder what people might say at my funeral. Now I am at a stage in my life where I occasionally ponder who will be the ones that will remember me in the years after my death? The importance of keeping the memory of our […]

November 28

New on Blu-ray: Misery

“I’m your number one fan!” To this day that line still gives me chills. I guess that is one of the enduring charms of Misery, it is a thriller that manages to make you uneasy despite its lack of gore. The premise is grounded in just enough reality to be identifiable. Frankly the film feels […]

November 25

BITS 2017: Darken

Audrey Cummings’much anticipated follow-up to her stirring Berkshire County is a high concept science fiction story set in a strange world not too far off from our own. Darken is the type of film that one could easily see as a trilogy or a 13-part series on one of the numerous streaming services. Hopefully Cummings […]

November 24

BITS 2017: Paint the Town Red, Itch, Crux: Black Sol Empire

Paint the Town Red Scoring tickets to an ultra upscale night club, Josephine (Ariel Hansen, who co-directs the film with Christopher Andrew Graham) and Andie (Allison Klause who is delightful in the role) are excited to have a girls’ night out on the town. Unlike her oblivious party eager friend, Andie cannot help but notice […]

November 24

BITS 2017: Fake Blood

Low-budget horror filmmakers Rob Grant (director/co-writer) and Mike Kovacs (co-writer) turn the camera on themselves and blur the line between reality in fiction in their latest effort, Fake Blood. When Grant and Kovacs receive a video nitpicking one of the more gruesome scenes in their previous film Mon Ami, they find themselves considering the connection […]

November 23

BITS 2017: Kill Order

James Mark’s Kill Order plays like a throwback to the type of action films that were prevalent in the 90’s. The foot to face martial arts films that helped to make individuals such as Billy Blanks, Cynthia Rothrock and Jalal Merhi international stars. If there is any justice, then Chris Mark will follow suit. An […]

November 22

BITS 2017: Red Spring

It is tempting to call Jeff Sinasac’s Red Spring a vampire film for The Walking Dead generation. The film features a group of survivors thrown together in a land ravaged by vampires with only each other to rely on. However, such a simplistic comparison does a disservice to all the things that makes Sinasac’s tale […]

November 21

BITS 2017: Buckout Road

Buckout Road is real, a stretch of road near the New York suburb of White Plains, and over the years a number of urban legends have grown around it. In colonial times, they say, women were burned at the stake as witches there. Others claim that the early nineteenth century, the Buckhout family held albino […]

November 20

EUFF 2017: My Name Is Emily

Mental stability and genius are two edges of a thin piece of wire. Robert (Michael Smiley) is bubbling under the wrong side of the ledger until his daughter Emily (Evanna Lynch) is born. Emily inspires Robert to fully blossoms as a person. He becomes a teacher and is moved to write a book turns into […]

November 19

EUFF 2017: The Citizen

Wilson (Dr. Cake-Baly Marcelo) has been trying to pass the citizenship test for years. He is a political refugee in Hungary having lost his wife, and two daughters who are still missing, in a conflict in his native land Guinea-Bissau. He works as a security guard in a supermarket and lives in an apartment complex […]

November 15

New on Blu-ray: In this Corner of the World

It is common for films recounting the turbulent nature of World War II, especially the bombing of Hiroshima, to focus on the devastation. The horrors of war is something that audiences still find disturbing and fascinating with equal measure. This is why Sunao Katabuchi’s In this Corner of the World is such an intriguing work. […]

November 07

Mudbound

Mudbound has been on my mind a lot since I saw at the Toronto International Film Festival a few months ago. In observing the vitriol spewed toward NFL players peacefully invoking their right to protest, my thoughts have turned to one of the common talking points regarding how such protests are a slap in the […]

November 05

THOR: RAGNAROK

At this point in the series, I’m likely talking to devotees when discussing Thor: Ragnarok. There are at a minimum 4 other movies you’d need to have pretty decent knowledge of to understand most of what’s going on here (Thor, Thor: The Dark World, The Avengers, and The Avengers: Age of Ultron). However, I would […]

October 30

The Square

The standout scene in Ruben Östlund’s latest satire The Square involves a performance artist (Terry Notary) mimicking an ape at a black-tie fundraiser. The guests are amused at first as the muscular figure beats his chest and stares down those in his path. The assertion of dominance quickly descends down a dark path as the […]

October 24

TADFF 2017: Lowlife

There’s nothing like a good crime caper film to get people excited, and Ryan Prows’ first feature film, Lowlife does just that. Using his Taco restaurant as a front, Teddy ‘Bear’ Haynes (Mark Burnham) is an organ runner and pimp, using illegal immigrants as his main supply. He has El Monstruo (Ricardo Adam Zarate), as […]

October 22

imagineNATIVE 2017: The Road Forward

There’s been a great deal of discussion in recent years about the past and ongoing injustices suffered by the indigenous community. As there should be. From suicide epidemics to systemic racism to the alarming number of missing and murdered Aboriginal women to the over-representation of Aboriginal men in Canadian prisons, the challenges of the First […]

October 22

imagineNATIVE 2017: Kayak to Klemtu

Teenagers. They think they know it all, don’t they? They have this unbearable self-righteousness. They can take a motorboat to testify about the dangers posed by oil tankers and not feel a little hypocritical, not even a bit. The big picture is missed. Kayak to Klemtu, Zoe Hopkins’ first feature, finds itself in the same […]

October 22

imagineNATIVE 2017: Juliana & the Medicine Fish

Director Jeremy Torrie’s Juliana & The Medicine Fish adapts the popular Young Adult novel by Jake MacDonald, with both men co-writing the adaptation. The film tells the story of young Juliana over a summer at her father’s fishing lodge following the death of her mother. The two do not have the best relationship to begin […]

October 21

imagineNATIVE 2017: Our People Will Be Healed

Alanis Obomsawin is one of Canada’s most prolific filmmakers. At 85 years-old, and with an astounding 50 films under her belt, she has been an integral figure in promoting both indigenous culture and the issues that impact First Nation communities across the land. Last year, with her film We Can’t Make the Same Mistake Twice, […]