Toronto After Dark Review: Eega

Eega

Eega is a perfect example of why you should go into every film with an open mind. Reading the premise I immediately disregarded Eega as something not worth my time. It was a momentary lapse into the realm of film snobbery, I will admit it. Thankfully, I decided to ignore my first instinct and take a chance on what turned out to be one of the most entertaining revenge films I have seen in recent years.

Hilarious and surprisingly invented, Eega tells a tale of love and revenge like no other. Nani (Nani) and Bindhu (Samantha Ruth Prabhu) have been carrying on a romantic flirtation for the past two years. Just as they are finally about to cement their love, the dastardly Sudeep (Sudeep) puts a wrinkle into their plans. Convinced that he can get any woman he wants, Sudeep is perturbed when Bindhu pays no attention to his advances. Seeing Nani as his only obstacle to Bindhu’s heart, Sudeep kills Nani and makes it look like an accident. What Sudeep fails to realize is that true love never dies. When Nani is reincarnated as a common housefly, he only has revenge on his tiny mind. Nani sets in motion a revenge plot that truly needs to be seen to be believed.

Easily one of the craziest genre straddling films to ever be released, Eega is a delight from beginning to end. The film packs so much humour and action that it crackles at a brisk pace. What I especially loved about Eega is how well it is crafted on a technical level. Once you get past the notion that you are rooting for a CGI fly, which is a feat in itself, the creativity of the film really shines through. One example of this is the fantastic car crash sequence that is bookend with a hilarious death threat. Not only is the crash itself stunning, but the way the camera and lighting highlights Sudeep’s eyes as the threat is being issued adds to the overall comedic value.

Considering that the main character does not utter a single word, when in fly form, it is a wonder that the film is as engaging as it is. Director S.S. Rajamouli does a wonderful job of keeping the fly endearing by not making it immune to the common dangers the flies encounter when dealing with mankind. If Disney was to ever make a more violent version of Honey I Shrunk the Kids, I imagine it would something like this.

While I know the notion of a vengeful fly sounds ludicrous, which it is, I cannot stress enough how much fun this film iss to watch. It is the type of comedy that works best in a group setting. Despite its odd premise, and its insane moments, there is no denying that Eega is one of the most joyfully entertaining revenge flicks you will see this year.